Cemex and Suez launch new Waste-to-Fuel Facility

Cement Production

Cemex and Suez launch new Waste-to-Fuel Facility

At the Cemex Rugby cement plant, United Kingdom, a new facility has been launched which turns waste into high-specification fuel. The new facility will supply the cement plan with a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels for the next 25 years. The Solid Recovered Fuel facility, owned and operated by international recycling and waste management company Suez, will supply the a direct replacement for fossil fuel, manufactured using nothing but regionally-sourced rubbish.
(ed. WoMaMarcel - 24/9/2015)
<Blank Space>

Egham, United Kingdom – Jean-Marc Boursier, Senior Executive Vice President of Suez in charge of the Recycling and Waste Recovery division for Europe; Fernando A. Gonzalez, Chief Executive Officer of Cemex, along with Richard Dodd, Mayor of Rugby, officially opened the new Rugby Solid Recovered Fuel (SRF) facility on Friday September 18th, 2015, which will supply the Cemex Rugby Cement Plant with sustainable fuel for the next 25 years.

The SRF facility, owned and operated by international recycling and waste management company Suez, will supply the UK’s largest cement kiln - located in Rugby- with a direct replacement for fossil fuel, manufactured using nothing but regionally-sourced rubbish from across Warwickshire, Northamptonshire and the wider Midlands Area.

The fuel, known as Climafuel, replaces traditional coal as an energy supply and Suez will supply Cemex with a total of up to 240,000 tonnes of the fuel every year to help meet the significant energy needs of the Cemex plant and improve its environmental performance. The Rugby Solid Recovered Fuel Facility will produce up to 200,000 tonnes annually for the Cemex Rugby Cement Plant, with the balance of around 40,000 tonnes produced from Suez’s SRF plant in Landor Street in nearby Birmingham.

The Rugby Solid Recovered Fuel Facility was built as part of a 25-year contract between Suez and Cemex, signed in 2012 and understood to be the first of its kind with this duration in the UK outside of the PFI mechanism. 

Through the partnership between the two companies, Suez leased land opposite the kiln from Cemex in 2013, and construction of the GBP 18 million (approx. USD 27.8 million) fuel facility began in 2014. The commissioning of the process equipment took place earlier this year.

The SRF facility can process up to 300,000 tonnes of residual waste each year and around 70% of the input material comes from businesses in the region, while the remaining 30% is household waste, much of it originating from Northamptonshire County Council.

The majority of this waste would otherwise be destined for landfill but the SRF manufacturing process enables Suez to extract recyclable materials, such as plastics, card and metals, which any other way would be too contaminated to viably recycle.
 

Most read

Upcoming Events

Facebook